21 Books the BookBub Team Is Thankful for This Year

Posted on November 24, 2015 by

As we reflect on what we’re grateful for this Thanksgiving, it’s no surprise that books top our lists. Below, the BookBub team has shared some books we’re thankful for reading this year. These books impacted us in many ways — they provided comfort and entertainment; they made us laugh and cry; and they provoked us to see the world a little differently.

Happy Thanksgiving!

 

The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson

The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson

“This year, I really enjoyed The Girl Who Saved the King of Sweden by Jonas Jonasson. Much like Jonasson’s first novel, The 100 Year Old Man Who Climbed Out the Window and Disappeared, it stars an unlikely band of likable and not-so-likable characters who end up profoundly influencing international politics. The story drew me in quickly and was a lot of fun.” — Doug, Production and Support

 

Still Alice by Lisa Genova

Still Alice by Lisa Genova

“Like millions of other Americans, my family has been affected by Alzheimer’s, so this novel hit close to home. I thought about Alice’s plight while I was putting on my makeup in the morning, walking home from work in the evening, and cooking dinner at night — all simple tasks that can turn into mountainous challenges for someone battling this heartbreaking disease. Still Alice reminded me to be grateful for the little things — a perfect message for this time of year.” — Lisa, Marketing

 

Glock by Paul M. Barrett

Glock by Paul M. Barrett

“Opened my eyes to the world of gun lovers and the gun industry. Fascinating story behind this ingenious gun and its quick rise to being one of the most popular guns in America — dirty dealings and all.” — Rob, Engineering

 

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Uprooted by Naomi Novik

Uprooted by Naomi Novik

“I’m thankful for Uprooted by Naomi Novik. It was one of the best fantasy books I’ve read in a long time — original, beautifully written, and with a strong female protagonist. Hannah (Editorial) and I read it at the same time, and we both loved it!” — Carlyn, Business Development

 

The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison

The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison

“The Goblin Emperor by Katherine Addison was one of the two books this year (along with Uprooted) that reminded me why I fell in love with high fantasy in the first place. It manages to be fresh and smart while still feeling instantly familiar, like the books I read growing up. Filled with elegant prose and court intrigue, it also touches on race, politics, and gender issues. And while the language rules of the world are intricate and the cast large, the book never condescends to the reader. There’s no sequel needed, but I can’t help hoping that Addison decides to write one.” — Hannah, Editorial

 

The World of Yesterday by Stefan Zweig

The World of Yesterday by Stefan Zweig

“I love The World of Yesterday by Stefan Zweig. A eulogy of the old European world and an alarm to the new world. A deep insight into war and humanity. It makes me think a lot about the world we are living in today.” — Emily, Design

 

The Martian by Andy Weir

The Martian by Andy Weir

“I absolutely loved The Martian by Andy Weir. The protagonist Mark Watney had a unique and hilarious voice despite the arduous trials he faced, which made me root even harder for him to survive. And it’s so inspiring to know that Andy Weir initially self-published the book chapter-by-chapter on his website, ultimately landing him a book deal and movie deal. Seeing the stellar film adaptation was a real treat, too!” — Diana U., Industry Marketing

 

The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton

The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender

“The book that made the biggest impact on me this year was The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton. This YA book is about a girl with wings, but it is absolutely nothing like you would expect. It is exquisitely told, at the same time searing and lovely and sad, and I think it is one of the most unique books currently published in its genre.” — Brianna, Business Development

 

The Guardians: An Elegy for a Friend by Sarah Manguso

The Guardians by Sarah Manguso

“I love a good cry, and this year, I wept profusely while reading Sarah Manguso’s The Guardians: An Elegy for a Friend. This heartbreaking meditation on grief and mental illness serves as a beautiful reminder to cherish your loved ones.” — Mary, Editorial

 

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman

“While I tend to stick to literary fiction, I picked up The Ocean at the End of the Lane from the library earlier this fall. I’d forgotten how exciting fantasy can be, and I’m thankful for the reminder that you’re never too old to imagine a pond into an ocean.” — Sara, Editorial and Production

 

Golden Son by Pierce Brown

Golden Son by Pierce Brown

“This is the second book in his trilogy and the author is fearless. He kills off major characters and moves the plot forward at an incredible pace. The world-building by Brown is really rich and deep. Start with Red Rising, the first book in the trilogy, but don’t miss this one. I can’t wait for the final book due this winter.” — Adam, Engineering

 

A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin

A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin

“Like pretty much everyone else, my thirst for A Song of Ice and Fire reached an all-time high this year. These stories gave me a much-needed Westeros fix and will hopefully sustain me until The Winds of Winter releases next century.” — John, Marketing

 

Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson

Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson

Tiger Lily by Jodi Lynn Anderson was one of the best books I’ve read this year. It’s a beautiful and tragic interpretation of the classic Peter Pan tale that was more heartbreaking and haunting than I expected. Although it’s sad, I’m thankful I got to see Peter and Neverland from Tiger Lily’s perspective.” — Briana, Administration

 

Pastry by Nick Malgieri

Pastry by Nick Malgieri

“I’m thankful for Nick Malgieri’s Pastry, a cookbook with unreal pie recipes that have become my go-to ones for the holidays. Thank you for giving me the best pie crust recipe! Seriously amazing.” — Susan, Editorial

 

Boston 1775 by Francis Russell

Boston 1775 by Francis Russell

“I live in Charlestown, MA, and it was really interesting to learn about how my hometown was a pivotal part of the American Revolution.” — Dan, Marketing

 

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

Carry On by Rainbow Rowell

“This year I absolutely loved a wonderful Harry Potterinspired fantasy — Carry On by Rainbow Rowell. I’m grateful for the diversity of characters, the genius storytelling, and a brilliant magical adventure.” — Danielle, Editorial

 

Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson

Housekeeping my Marilynne Robinson

“During one of the blizzards last spring, I woke up early and opened Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping to read while waiting for the snow to stop — the book was so beautiful that I couldn’t stop, and I ended up devouring the whole thing in a single morning!” — Sarah, Marketing

 

The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi

The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi

“One of my favorite books this year was The Water Knife by Paolo Bacigalupi, a near-future thriller about water scarcity in the American West. Bacigalupi’s writing is fast and exciting, and his ideas are fresh and scary (in the best way!).” — Morgan, Business Development

 

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

“When I was at the New York Comic Con this year, there were a lot of lines and a lot of waiting around. So I was terribly grateful to have the novella Binti by Nnedi Okorafor by my side. There were times that I was actually sad that a panel was starting, because it meant I had to look up from this truly captivating read.” — Halli, Editorial

 

Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay

Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay

“Roxane Gay is one of my favorite writers — even her tweets are inspiring. This collection of incredibly important, sometimes funny, sometimes painful, always powerful essays left me reeling for a few days, like any good book should.” — Bridget, Production and Support

 

Red Azalea by Anchee Min

Red Azalea by Anchee Min

“Of the books I’ve read about the Cultural Revolution, Anchee Min’s Red Azalea is the one I could most relate to my parents’ experiences going from Shanghai’s tenements to doing forced labor in the freezing countryside. It’s helped me transcend — at least momentarily — a major language barrier and generation gap, and for that I’m very grateful.” — Diana C., Editorial

What books are you most thankful for this year?

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